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Linking words together

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Hi there!

During this lesson we're going to learn how to smoothly link words together.

As you may already know, the English language does not naturally flow.

The Italian language, on the other hand, flows very smoothly, due to the fact that many words begin with a consonant, and end with a vowel, so it's easy to link them all together.

So when we speak, how do we make English flow?

We simply detach the last consonant from each word and attach it onto the next word.

Here's an example:
I want to eat a pear and an orange

If we were to write the words in the same way in which we pronounce them, then the sentence would look something like this:

I-wan-to-(w)ea-ta-pea-randa-norange.

I-wan-to-(w)ea-ta-pea-randa-norange.

Note that when we speak we insert a: w sound to link the two vowels together: To (w) eat. To (w) eat.

We do this because, when we say the word: to, our mouths are already forming a closed shape so we add the: w sound to link to the: e in the word eat, in a fluid way: To (w) eat. To (w) eat.

Here's another example:

Am I going to be allowed a holiday in August? Yes I am.

Once again, if we were to write the words in the same way in which we pronounce them, then the sentence would look something like this:

A-mi-going-to-be-allowe-da-holida-yi-n-August? Ye-sai-(y)am.

Note that, in this case, when we speak we add a: y sound to link the two vowels together. Yes I (y) am. Yes I (y) am.

We do this because, when we say the word: I, are mouths are already forming a wide shape so we add the: y sound to link to the letter: a in a fluid way: Yes I (y) am. Yes I (y) am.

Then what happens when there are two consonants together which have the same sound, for example: I've got two books, I've got two books.

Well in this case, when a word ends with the letter: t and then it's followed immediately by a word which begins with the letter t we don't really pronounce the last t of the first word. What we actually do is make a pause just before we pronounce the letter t of the second word.

Try listening to the example again, and then repeat it after me.

I've got two books, I've got two books.

Here are some other examples.
Once again, try repeating each one after me.

I've got a black cat. I've got a black cat.
There's a sad dog in the middle of the road.There's a sad dog in the middle of the road. Can you see the big gorilla? Can you see the big gorilla? You normally boil lentils. How do you trap pigs?

So, now that you know how to link words together, try chatting with some new friends on GoSpeakEnglish to see how smoothly you can speak together!

And that's the end of this lesson!

Now you can see if you've understood the video, and do the test on GoSpeakEnglish. You can also watch many other English video lessons on GoSpeakEnglish.

Thanks, and I hope to see you again soon!

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Comments 1

Amelia Taylor on Tuesday, 26 January 2016 15:20

Here's another great lesson which helps students understand how we native speakers really speak.
I also liked the lesson about Word Stress which explains some similar issues.

Here's another great lesson which helps students understand how we native speakers really speak. I also liked the lesson about Word Stress which explains some similar issues.
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Thursday, 21 September 2017

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